It’s 2030. Peggy, is in her late 70s and lives in a very small village about 8 miles from her daughter, Sue. Previously, her home was damp, but energy costs were so high she couldn’t afford to heat it properly in winter. She took part in a Council-run scheme to retrofit her house with insulation and a more efficient heating system that used renewable-sourced electricity to power it. (Bailey’s dad did the job; he re-trained using an adult education grant after previously working as an oil delivery driver.) After that, the money Peggy spent on her energy bills was enough to properly heat her home in winter. Sue and Peggy regularly see each other using the extended rural electric bus service, which also means Peggy has reliable access to Penzance.

A portion of Peggy’s pension is invested in a similar scheme to the Kerrier Green Fund. This provides her with stable payments, while ensuring that her money stays in Cornwall and helps to provide new forms of employment for the next generation. In fact, Peggy’s granddaughter, Lilly, has just taken out a loan to start a clothing business with an all-Cornish supply chain.

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